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Travel Channel to explore UFO debris from the ‘Russian Roswell’ incident

The Travel Channel’s show Mysteries at the Museum will explore strange debris recovered in Dalnegorsk, a small mining town in Russia’s Far East.

According to the Travel Channel, their show Mysteries at the Museum will examine this “collection of mysterious debris that may be proof of alien intelligence.” The National Atomic Testing Museum described the show in a recent press release, stating, “Allan Palmer, Executive Director of the National Atomic Testing Museum, examines a collection of rocks found after a strange explosion in Russia. The debris has some very unusual properties, confounding scientists since its discovery in 1986.”

National Atomic Testing Museum Executive Director Allan Palmer examining the mysterious debris. (Credit: Travel Channel)

The metals were allegedly collected after a UFO crashed into Izvestkovaya Mountain on January 29, 1986. According to Russian news site Pravda, witnesses described the UFO as a silent reddish sphere that “slowly ascended and descended, and its glow would heat up every time it rose up.” Witnesses then say that, as the UFO approached the mountain, it “jerked” and “fell down like a rock.”

This incident is widely referred to as the Russian Roswell, referencing the famous alleged 1947 UFO crash near Roswell, New Mexico.

Emmy-winning Las Vegas journalist George Knapp traveled to the crash site to investigate the case in the 1990s. As Lee Speigel of the Huffington Post reported on March 26, 2012, Knapp was given samples of debris collected at the crash site. And one of those samples is now on display at the National Atomic Testing Museum in Las Vegas.

As Speigel relayed in his article, the description that accompanies this material at the museum states:

Three Soviet academic centers and 11 research institutes analyzed the objects from this UFO crash. The distance between atoms is different from ordinary iron. Radar cannot be reflected from the material. Elements in the material may disappear and new ones appear after heating. One piece disappeared completely in front of four witnesses. The core of the material is composed of a substance with anti-gravitational properties.

The display at the museum labels this material as an “Authentic Alien Artifact.”

The episode of Mysteries at the Museum featuring the Russian Roswell debris airs Thursday, December 6 at 9/8c on the Travel Channel.

About Jason McClellan

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Jason McClellan is a UFO journalist and the producer/co-host of the web series Spacing Out! He is also the web content manager and staff writer for OpenMinds.tv, and a co-organizer and technical producer of the International UFO Congress. As a founding member of Open Minds, Jason served as a writer and editor for the now defunct Open Minds magazine. He has appeared on Syfy, NatGeo, and, most recently, he co-starred on H2's Hangar 1: The UFO Files. ------ Follow Jason on Twitter @acecentric and subscribe to Jason's updates on Facebook.

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