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Astrophysicist Brian Schmidt. (Credit: National Science Foundation)
Astrophysicist Brian Schmidt. (Credit: National Science Foundation)

Another physicist voices grim view of alien visitation

Noted theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has stated on multiple occasions that, if extraterrestrials visit Earth, they will be hostile. And just recently, another physicist announced his grim outlook for alien visitation.

Astrophysicist Brian Schmidt (Credit: Markus Pössel / Wikimedia Commons)

During his recent presentation at the 28th General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union in Beijing, astrophysicist Brian P. Schmidt advised against attempting contact with intelligent extraterrestrials. According to Space Daily, Schmidt stated, “I think it is probably not the smartest thing to tell the aliens where we are, as any encounter with aliens may not be a happy one.”

But Schmidt, who won the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics, also suggests that extraterrestrials are so far away from Earth that an alien attack isn’t something with which Earthlings should be concerned. He explained, “It will be so far away and it takes so long to travel from point A to point B in the universe that [an alien encounter] won’t be a problem.”

Jill Tarter, former director of the Center for SETI Research, announced earlier this year that she disagrees with the cynical views of alien visitation like those of Stephen Hawking. She said, “While Sir Stephen Hawking warned that alien life might try to conquer or colonize Earth, I respectfully disagree.”

Although views related to possible motives of visiting extraterrestrials differ, the topic of intelligent extraterrestrial life is being discussed more often by leading scientific minds.

About Jason McClellan

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Jason McClellan is a UFO journalist and the producer/co-host of the web series Spacing Out! He is also the web content manager and staff writer for OpenMinds.tv, and a co-organizer and technical producer of the International UFO Congress. As a founding member of Open Minds, Jason served as a writer and editor for the now defunct Open Minds magazine. He has appeared on Syfy, NatGeo, and, most recently, he co-starred on H2's Hangar 1: The UFO Files. ------ Follow Jason on Twitter @acecentric and subscribe to Jason's updates on Facebook.

2 comments

  1. avatar

    Once again, a truly brilliant person speculates on something they fail to view with objectivity, IMO. I really respect Mr. Hawking, Mr. Schmidt and anyone else with the brains and skills to navigate the scientific world successfully. However, if there is a 1 in 1 billion chance of an earth-like planet in our galaxy, there are about 300 such planets in the milky way. Likely numbers are more like 200,000,000 such planets. The chance of intelligent life on some of those planets is clearly very high.

    For evidence of alien visitation, please look into the September 16th, 1994 incident, when teachers and school officials at the Ariel school in Ruwa, Zimbabwe, were amazed when about 60 students, aged approximately five to twelve years old, reported seeing a strange flying object had landed on the school grounds during morning recess. An alien emerged and all students had the same story. This was documented by Dr. John Mack, former head of psychology at Harvard.

    There have also been instances of UFO’s causing nuclear missiles to be inoperable, and launch codes having to be re-set on the missiles. Capt. Robert Salas has much to say about these shut down incidents: one was Echo Flight on March 16, 1967 at Malmstron AFB in Wyoming.

    Given the massive distances between stars, aliens must have faster than light drive, probably inertia-less, and a technical level that makes our sorry grasp of physics seem truly infantile. With such sophisticated technology, if they wanted our planet they could easily take it. Perhaps they visit and disable our nukes as a hint to stop trying so eagerly to destroy ourselves and our planet.

  2. avatar

    Marco, you fall into the same “speculation” trap as those you accuse: “Once again, a truly brilliant person speculates on something they fail to view with objectivity”

    First, you ASSUME with only one example, Life on Earth, that somehow one can formulate ODDS, probabilities. You are already on the wrong logical track.

    Pointing at billions and billions of stars doesn’t give you any “probability” at all.

    That we have not been openly visited by a benign delegation of aliens who arrive openly and maintain communications openly that supersede any attempts by governments to hide them from the populace could well mean that all of the billions and billions of stars are empty of life.

    Surely the universe has allowed more than ample time for successive civilizations to reach development stages sufficient for exploration of other galaxies.

    In fact, this IS the evidence so far. The EVIDENCE is quite weighted on the side of 0 to Billions and Trillions.

    All of the NUMBERS when accounted for; age of universe, billions and billions of “potential” planets that “must” have sprung intelligent life that lived far longer than we have in a state of technological progress so far beyond ours, proclaim that if we have not seen undeniable evidence of star-traveling aliens then we are the Big One. Against Billions of Zeroes.

    Likewise, as some wise scientists have said, the CHANCES of a Devastating encounter, however small, are ENOUGH to say, “Hold on. If they come it may be our death as a culture, as a species.”

    You can have other “viewpoints”, but they are absolute guesses that do not at all controvert the wisdom of keeping our heads low in the Galaxies. We will always be monumentally inferior to any civilization that had the power and inclination to come see us first.

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